Archives For Napoleon Hill

Desire.

Strong, deeply rooted desire is the starting point of all achievement. Just as the electron is the last unit of matter discernable to the scientist, DESIRE is the seed of all achievement: the starting place, back of which there is nothing, or at least there is nothing of which we have any knowledge.

A definite chief aim, which is only another name for DESIRE, would be meaningless unless based upon a deeply seated, strong desire for the object of the chief aim. Many people “wish” for many things, but a wish is not the equivalent of a strong DESIRE, and therefore wishes are of little or no value unless they are crystallized into the more definite form of DESIRE.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success (1928)

The Value of Adopting a Chief Aim.

This lesson on Accurate Thought not only describes the real purpose of a definite chief aim, but it explains in simple terms the principles through which such an aim or purpose may be realized. We first create the objective toward which we are striving, through the imaginative faculty of the mind, then transfer an outline of this objective to paper by writing out a definite statement of it in the nature of a definite chief aim. By daily reference to this written statement the idea or thing aimed for is taken up by the conscious mind and handed over to the sub-conscious mind, which, in turn, directs the energies of the body to transform the desire into material form.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success (1928)

Those who talk too much do little else. If you talk more than you listen, you not only deprive yourself of many opportunities to accumulate useful knowledge, but you also disclose your plans and purposes to people who will take great delight in defeating you, because they envy you.

Remember, also, that every time you open your mouth in the presence of a person who has an abundance of knowledge, you display to that person, your exact stock of knowledge, or your lack of it! Genuine wisdom is usually conspicuous through modesty and silence.

~ Napoleon Hill, Think & Grow Rich (1937)

Poverty and riches often change places. The Crash taught the world this truth, although the world will not long remember the lesson. Poverty may, and generally does, voluntarily take the place of riches. When riches take the place of poverty, the change is usually brought about through well-conceived and carefully executed PLANS. Poverty needs no plan. It needs no one to aid it, because it is bold and ruthless. Riches are shy and timid. They have to be “attracted.” Riches are shy and timid. They have to be “attracted.”

Anybody can wish for riches, and most

People do, but only a few know that a

definite plan, plus a burning desire

for wealth, are the only dependable

means of accumulating wealth.

~ Napoleon Hill, Think & Grow Rich (1937)

Nothing is permanent except change. Life resembles a great kaleidoscope before which Time is ever shifting, changing and rearranging both the stage setting and the players. New friends are constantly replacing the old. Everything is in a state flux. In every heart is the seed of both rascality and justice. Every human being is both a criminal and a saint, depending upon the expediency of the moment as to which will assert itself. Honesty and dishonesty are largely matters of individual viewpoint. The weak and the strong, the rich and the poor, the ignorant and the well-informed are exchanging places continuously.

Know YOURSELF and you know the entire human race. There is but one real achievement, and that is the ability to THINK ACCURATELY. We move with the procession, or behind it, but we cannot stand still.

Nothing is permanent except change!

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success (1928)

By establishing a reputation as being a person who always renders more service and better service than that for which you are paid, you will benefit by comparison with those around you who do not render such service, and the contrast will be noticeable that there will be keen competition for your services, no matter what your life-work may be.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success

There are ten weaknesses against which most of us must guard ourselves. One of these is the habit of trying to reap before we have sown, and the other nine are all wrapped up in the one practice of creating alibis to cover every mistake made.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success

You come, now, to the study of self-control, through which you may direct your enthusiasm to constructive ends. Without self-control enthusiasm resembles the unharnessed lighting of an electrical storm—it may strike anywhere; it may destroy life and property.

Enthusiasm is the vital quality that arouses you to action, while self-control is the balance wheel that directs your action so that it will build up and not tear down.

To be a person who is well “balanced,” you must be a person in whom enthusiasm and self-control are equalized. A survey which I have just completed of the 160,000 adult inmates of the penitentiaries of the United States discloses the startling fact that ninety-two per cent of these unfortunate men and women are in prison because they lacked the necessary self-control to direct their energies constructively.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success

Persistence is a state of mind, therefore it can be cultivated. Like all states of mind, persistence is based upon definite causes, among them these:-

  1. Definiteness of purpose. Knowing what one wants is the first and, perhaps, the most important step toward the development of persistence. A strong motive forces one to surmount many difficulties.
  2. Desire. It is comparatively easy to acquire and to maintain persistence in pursuing the object of intense desire.
  3. Self-reliance. Belief in one’s ability to carry out a plan encourages one to follow the plan through with persistence. (Self-reliance can be developed through the principle described in the chapter on auto-suggestion.)
  4. Definiteness of plans. Organized plans, even though they may be weak and entirely impractical, encourage persistence.
  5. Accurate knowledge. Knowing that one’s plans are sound, based upon experience or observation, encourages persistence; “guessing” instead of “knowing” destroys persistence.
  6. Co-operation. Sympathy, understanding, and harmonious cooperation with others tend to develop persistence.
  7. Will-power. The habit of concentrating one’s thoughts upon the building of plans for the attainment of a definite purpose, leads to persistence.
  8. Habit. Persistence is the direct results of habit. The mind absorbs and becomes a part of the daily experiences upon which it feeds. Fear, the worst of all enemies, can be effectively cured by forced repetition of acts of courage. Everyone who has seen active service in war knows this.

Before leaving the subject of persistence, take inventory of yourself, and determine in what particular, if any, you are lacking in this essential quality. Measure yourself courageously, point by point, and see how many of the eight factors of persistence you lack. The analysis may lead to discoveries that will give you a new grip on yourself.

~ Napoleon Hill, Think & Grow Rich

You never can tell what a thought will do

In bringing you hate or love;

For thoughts are things, and their airy wings

Are swifter than a carrier dove.

They follow the law of the universe,–

Each thought creates its kind,

And they speed o’er the track to bring you back

Whatever went out from your mind.

~ Napoleon Hill, The Law of Success