Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn

John C. Maxwell believes that the greatest lessons we learn in life are from our losses. Everyone experiences loss, but not everyone learns from it.

In Sometimes You Win Sometimes You Learn, Dr. Maxwell explores the most common lessons we learn when we experience loss. He then explains how to turn a set-back into a step forward by examining the eleven elements that make up the DNA of those who learn:

  • Humility – The Spirit of Learning
  • Reality – The Foundation of Learning
  • Responsibility – The First Step of Learning
  • Improvement – The Focus of Learning
  • Hope – The Motivation of Learning
  • Teachability – The Pathway of Learning
  • Adversity – The Catalyst of Learning
  • Problems – The Opportunities of Learning
  • Bad Experiences – The Perspective for Learning
  • Change – The Price of Learning
  • Maturity – The Value of Learning

Learning is not easy during down times; it takes discipline to do the right thing when everything is wrong. This book provides a road map to doing just that.

As John Maxwell often points out–experience isn’t the best teacher; evaluated experience is.

Seven Session Mastermind Group 

Session Mastermind Study Group Class Schedule Date *
One Class Introductions

Chapter One: When You’re Losing, Everything Hurts

Chapter Two: Humility – The Spirit of Learning

August 13, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Two Chapter Three: Reality – The Foundation of Learning

Chapter Four: Responsibility – The First Step of Learning

August 27, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Three Chapter Five: Improvement – The Focus of Learning

Chapter Six: Hope – The Motivation of Learning

September 10, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Four Chapter Seven: Teachability – The Pathway of Learning

Chapter Eight: Adversity – The Catalyst of Learning

September 24, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Five Chapter Nine: Problems – The Opportunities for Learning

Chapter Ten: Bad Experiences – The Perspective for Learning

October 8, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Six Chapter Eleven: Change – The Price of Learning

Chapter Twelve: Maturity – The Value of Learning

October 22, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Seven Chapter Thirteen: Winning Isn’t Everything, But Learning Is

Review / Wrap Up

November 5, 2018

7:00 – 9:00 pm

 

*This mastermind group is limited to ten participants, with a minimum of six participants to start the class.

Sessions will include a video, handouts and group discussion on the curriculum and activities to incorporate from each lesson.

Time and Scheduled dates: 7:00 – 9:00 pm, Every other Monday on 8/13, 8/27, 9/10, 9/24, 10/8, 10/22, 11/5.

Meeting Location: 216 N. 2nd St. Room 103, Bismarck, ND

Investment: $249 + book

To register or for more information contact Dave Leingang at email dave@daveleingang.com or call 701-527-7416.

 

Quotes from the book:

“I sometimes react to making a mistake as if I have betrayed myself. My fear of making a mistake seems to be based on the hidden assumption that I am potentially perfect and that if I can just be very careful, I will not fall from heaven. But a mistake is a declaration of the way I am, a jolt to the way I intend, a reminder that I am not dealing with facts. When I have listened to my mistakes, I have grown.” —Hugh Prather

“Those who profit from adversity possess a spirit of humility and are therefore inclined to make the necessary changes needed to learn from their mistakes, failures, and losses. … When we are focused too much on ourselves, we lose perspective. Humility allows us to regain perspective and see the big picture. … Humility allows us to let go of perfection and keep trying.” —John Maxwell

“Most people spend their entire lives in a fantasy Island called ‘Someday I’ll.’” —Denis Waitley

“An idealist believes the short-run doesn’t count. A cynic believes the long run doesn’t matter. A realist believes that what is done or left undone in the short-run determines the long run.” —Sydney J. Harris

“Those things that hurt, instruct.” —Benjamin Franklin

“You can’t grow and learn if your focus is on finding someone else to blame instead of looking at your own shortcomings.” —John Maxwell

“The highest reward for our toil is not what we get for it but what we become by it. … Mistakes are not failures. They are proof that we are making an effort. When we understand that, we can more easily move out of our comfort zone, try something new, and improve. … Improvement demands a commitment to grow long after the mood in which it was made has passed.” —John Maxwell

“Success in most things comes not from some gigantic stroke of fate, but from simple, incremental progress.” —Andrew Wood

“The main trouble with despair is that it is self-fulfilling. People who fear the worst tend to invite it. Heads that are down can’t scan the horizon for new openings. Bursts of energy do not spring from a spirit of defeat. Ultimately, helplessness leads to hopelessness.” —Norman Cousins

“Positive thinking must be followed by positive doing.” —John Maxwell

“When you are influential and highly respected, people tend to tell you what you want to hear, not what you need to hear. They are seeking your approval, or they flatter you. Unfortunately, this creates a gap between what you hear and reality. If you find yourself in that situation, you will need to work extra hard to get the people close to you to speak honestly into your life. And you will have to become highly intentional in observing and listening.” —John Maxwell

“Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you would have preferred to talk.” —Doug Larson

“Circumstances are the rulers of the weak; but they are the instruments of the wise.” —Samuel Lover

“Mistakes are painful when they happen, but years later a collection of mistakes is what is called experience.” —Denis Waitley

“Ninety percent of those who fail are not actually defeated; they simply quit. … As you face bad experiences, it’s important for you to remember that you can rarely see the benefits while you’re in the midst of them. You usually gain perspective on the other side of it.” —John Maxwell

“Most people would rather change their circumstances to improve their lives when instead they need to change themselves to improve their circumstances. They put in just enough effort to distance themselves from their problems without ever trying to go after the root, which can often be found in themselves. Because they don’t try to change the source of their problems, their problems keep coming back at them.” —John Maxwell

“To grow, you must be willing to let your present and future be totally unlike your past. Your history is not your destiny.” —Alan Cohen

“If I had my life to live over again, I’d make the same mistakes, only sooner.” —Tallulah Bankhead

“Maturity is doing what you are supposed to be doing, when you’re supposed to be doing it, no matter how you feel.” —Dom Capers

“Have you not succeeded? Continue! Have you succeeded? Continue!” —Fridtjof Nansen, Nobel Peace Prize winner

“How we think when we lose determines how long it will be until we win.” —G.K. Chesterton